Chinatown meeting roundup: CNC, CCBA

The Chinatown/South Cove Neighborhood Committee met at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association on Sept. 21. Michael Crisp discussed safety at Tufts Medical Center.  (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.) 華埠南灣社區議會於9月21日在中華公所舉行會議。Michael Crisp報告塔芙茨醫療中心的犯罪近況。(圖片由黃靈美攝。)

The Chinatown/South Cove Neighborhood Committee met at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association on Sept. 21. Michael Crisp discussed safety at Tufts Medical Center. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.)

By Ling-Mei Wong

 

The Chinatown/South Cove Neighborhood Committee met at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (CCBA) on Sept. 21.

A presentation on workplace safety at Tufts Medical Center was given by Michael Crisp, director of public safety at Tufts. A number of incidents related to larceny, drug use, prostitution and homelessness have affected the hospital, resulting in the hiring of 12 security officers, up from none four years ago, he said. Its main entrance at 885 Washington Street leads to the atrium on Bennet Street, which has significant foot traffic. The main entrance and Bennet Street entrance will be closed on weekends starting November from Friday 8 p.m. to Monday 5:30 a.m. Weekend guests will enter from the emergency room on Washington Street, which will be staffed by security personnel.

“Crime in the facility is a big issue,” Crisp said. “In a year, we’ve had 40 to 50 overdoses in the bathrooms … we’ve found trespassers taking showers in patient rooms on upper floors.”

The Planning Office for Urban Affairs (POUA), a community developer affiliated with the Archdiocese of Boston, plans to develop affordable housing at 48 Boylston Street, the former Boston Young Men’s Christian Union building. The ground floor will be commercial space and offices for St. Francis House staff, which is across the road, said Lisa Alberghini, POUA president. The upper four floors will be 46 affordable units and a lot behind the building will be developed for 90 to 100 affordable units. POUA is working on project permits and financing, with the earliest completion date of 2017 to 2018.

The Chinatown/South Cove Neighborhood Committee met at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association on Sept. 21. said Lisa Alberghini, president of The Planning Office for Urban Affairs, discussed plans to develop affordable housing at 48 Boylston Street. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.) 華埠南灣社區議會於9月21日在中華公所舉行會議。城市事務規劃辦公室總裁Lisa Alberghini報告寶來斯頓街48號的項目。(圖片由黃靈美攝。)

The Chinatown/South Cove Neighborhood Committee met at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association on Sept. 21. Lisa Alberghini, president of The Planning Office for Urban Affairs, discussed plans to develop affordable housing at 48 Boylston Street. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.)

An update on Parcel 12 was given by Debbie Chen, community planner at Asian Community Development Corporation. The community developer is drawing up a community vision for Parcel 12 on Washington and Tremont streets, which is public land owned by the Boston Redevelopment Authority.

 

CCBA

The CCBA met at its 90 Tyler Street headquarters on Sept. 29.

Boston real estate developer the Davis Companies (TDC) bought 112 Shawmut Street from Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD), which runs a  Head Start program that will relocate. TDC presented a proposal to develop a mixed-use development on the site and CCBA’s property at 50 Herald Street, which abuts 112 Shawmut. The combined site would allow more housing units to be built, compared to developing each site separately. More affordable housing  units could be built as well and retail space could accommodate businesses, such as current Herald Street tenant C-Mart.

“By virtue of working with us, you get an additional 88,000 square feet of construction on your land,” said Jonathan Davis, CEO of the Davis Companies.

No action was taken on the presentation.

The Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association met at its 90 Tyler Street headquarters on Sept. 29. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.) 中華公所於9月29日在其位於泰勒街90號的總部舉行會議。(圖片由黃靈美攝。)

The Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association met at its 90 Tyler Street headquarters on Sept. 29. (Image courtesy of Ling-Mei Wong.)

The CCBA directors voted to repair its roof, which is leaking. The building was opened in 1847 as the Josiah Quincy School, which closed in 1976 and became home to the CCBA.

Tai Tung Village, which is owned by the CCBA, had three retail tenants renew their leases: American Chinese Christian Educational & Social Services (ACCESS), Tai Tung Pharmacy and convenience store Hainan Sun.

The Tai Tung Village outdoor playground is overcrowded, so the directors voted to limit usage to tenants and residents. Sunshine Childcare Center is a tenant at two storefronts, while ACCESS has an after-school program for children, resulting in high demand.

The next CCBA officer election takes place Dec. 1.

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About Ling-Mei Wong 黃靈美

Editor of the Sampan, the only bilingual Chinese-English newspaper in New England. Contact Ling-Mei at [email protected] 舢舨報紙總編輯。舢舨是全紐英倫唯一的中英雙語雙週報。
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